Posts

SEO Basics: Off Page SEO

So most people who have a blog or website, they have heard of SEO, search engine optimization…but it usually thought of as an online activity.  But what about off page SEO?

Off page SEO is the idea to

Chain Link

Chain Link (Photo credit: small world)

improve rankings by adding relevant links or link building. If you can get links from websites which are similar in content to your – you have potential to get more traffic to your website.

Off Page SEO – places to look for links:

There are many places to get links, there will be as many opinions on link building as there are websites on the interwebs.  Here are a few solid, quality places to get links:

  • newspapers – newspapers have great websites with quality links…check with local reports to see what you can help contribute.  Newspapers have solid websites and links you get from them will be quality.
  • universities – if you have a product for sale, allow discounts for students and faculty.  By offering coupon code – you can get listed on university websites.
  • directories – these are still a solid place.  Check out Yahoo and other market specific options.  Sometimes there are membership fees, but they generally have great google power.
  • guest blogging – another popular option is guest blogging.  People accept articles for their site and you get a link.  Its a great trade for content similar copy.

Be careful to only post high quality, unique content to your website.  Look to focus on keywords designated for this page, use this quick quiz to etermine if a site is a good option to get links:

  • Is the website that I am using relevant?
  • Will I be able to attract the right kind of traffic?
  • Does this website have what it takes to bring traffic to my website?

If the answer to these questions is yes, then you may have found a site with a good link opportunity. If you answer no, then you should continue your search to find a better fit.

Off page SEO is effective and you should use it as a beginner. It will help you grow online at a faster rate and the results will be good for you and your website.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Why does my site need SEO – Part 1/2

Why on car

Why on car (Photo credit: openpad)

And how is that going to help me get better rankings, more visits and more money?  And who needs SEO anyway?

If you want to be number one in Google for a given term, you need to start from a couple of things that SEO cannot give you:

  • get a mission,
  • build a brand,
  • produce amazing content and
  • share it with the rest of the world

Oh, and don’t forget to let Google know.

So – why does my site need SEO?

If relevance and importance are what you need to be at the top, you don’t want to shoot yourself in the foot by blocking all that from Google’s view. In this two-post series, you will learn about the possible SEO pitfalls that may limit your ranking in the search engines, and how to fix them.

  1. You have too many non-text elements.
    Flash Javascript, AJAX, they make your site look fancy, and your designer sure did a good job, but they have a problem: they’re not text, which is what search engines crawl to understand what a page is about. So unless you are a very well established brand like Armani or KFC (in that case visitors will use your name to get to your site), remove those elements, or at least keep them to a bare minimum.
  2. You use the same title tags and meta description in every page.
    Every page needs to have its own piece of content with its own unique title. Google already knows the name of your site from the home page, so don’t use it every time. The same applies to the meta descriptions (the snippet that appears under the link in the search results): make them unique and compelling to click on.
  3. Your URLs are dynamic.
    OK, we’re getting a little technical here, but bear with me. An URL like www.example.com/category/wedding-dresses is static (meaning that the page doesn’t change unless you edit it), and will give the search engine a pretty clear idea of the content of the page. On the other hand, when the content is pulled from a database and is the result different parameters, you will get a dynamic URL with those parameters in it. There are two issues with that: first the search parameters are non-descriptive (they read something like item, sectionid, option  and so on), and this won’t give Google any information about the content. Also, when different parameters give the same result, there can be two or more URLs for the same content, leaving the search engine wondering which one should be indexed.
  4. You have one home page, but different URLs.
    Even when your site is not database-driven, your home page might still have different URLs pointing at it. For example:http://example .com – http://www.example .com – http://example .com/index.php – http://www.example .com/index.phpThe result of this division is that the page rank for the home page will be divided in four, thus diluting your efforts of building authority to your site.The solution to dynamic and multiple URLs is an HTTP code called 301, which redirects all the different versions to the canonical one, making it more clear for the search engine.

The list doesn’t end here; stay tuned for the second part…

Enhanced by Zemanta

7 SEO Mistakes with your Online Marketing

Business

Business (Photo credits: www.roadtrafficsigns.com)

All the small businesses know they need more marketing and most know they need good SEO – not make SEO mistakes.  Some people have a healthy size of SEO for breakfast each day – and if you do, you probably know all the marketing mistakes we’re going to outline?

How many Marketing/SEO mistakes do you know?

  1. No website, or if you do have one – it’s not crawlable by the search engines. Sometimes it takes a tick in the wrong box in the dashboard of your site to block the search engines.  Local SEO is super important to small business success today.
  2. No sitemap. Another simple, yet crucial thing – search engines want to crawl your site, and the best way is to give them a list of all the links they can use.  There are a number of good plugins which can help if you are using wordpress.
  3. You’re not including the right words on the page, we call them keywords. Google reads text to know what your site is about. What are the visitors more likely to type when they need to find a business like yours? Also, describe what you do, your mission, product, services, and so on.  This is an SEO mistake many people make, but is really a basic task – and remember, only one keyword per page.
    (Learn more about SEO and keywords)
  4. No title and meta-description on your pages. This follows the same principle of the previous point: Google wants to know immediately what the page is about by the title, possibly in 70 characters maximum, so make it descriptive and interesting. That’s where your marketing actually begins, and it’s especially true for the home page. Same for the description of the page: make it interesting so that users will click on your page and not on the ones higher in the rankings.
    (Learn more about title tags)
  5. You’re thinking in terms of link building and not in terms of marketing and promotion. Links are important, we all know that, but the more you rely on search engine traffic, the more you are exposing your business to future algorithm changes. Think in terms on marketing instead: build your brand and get in touch with the off-line world as well.
  6. Are you using resources for webmaster. It’s very easy to get lost in SEO, but even if you’re not a professional, you should still stay up-to-date with what is happening in the online world. Both Google and Bing have webmaster tools.  Stay away from information overload, but keep on learning.
  7. Lastly is an old favorite with a new twist – participating in conversation within your community. Your site is about you and your business, but don’t forget the community of people in your industry out there. Engage with them and give value, it will pay off in the long run.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Why does my site need SEO? (Part 1)

And how is that going to help me get better rankings, more visits and more money?  And who needs SEO anyway?

If you want to be number one in Google for a given term, you need to start from a couple of things that SEO cannot give you:

  • Get a mission
  • Build a brand
  • Produce amazing content
  • Share it with the rest of the world.

Oh, and don’t forget to let Google know. That’s where SEO can help: if relevance and importance are what you need to be at the top, you don’t want to shoot yourself in the foot by blocking all that from Google’s view.

In this two-post series, you will learn about the possible SEO pitfalls that may limit your ranking in the search engines, and how to fix them.

SEO Issue:  You have too many non-text elements

Flash Javascript, AJAX, they make your site look fancy, and your designer sure did a good job, but they have a problem: they’re not text, which is what search engines crawl to understand what a page is about. So unless you are a very well established brand like Armani or KFC (in that case visitors will use your name to get to your site), remove those elements, or at least keep them to a bare minimum.

SEO Issue: You use the same title tags and meta description in every page

Every page needs to have its own piece of content with its own unique title. Google already knows the name of your site from the home page, so don’t use it every time. The same applies to the meta descriptions (the snippet that appears under the link in the search results): make them unique and compelling to click on.

SEO Issue: Your URLs are dynamic

OK, we’re getting a little technical here, but bear with me. An URL like www.example.com/category/wedding-dresses is static (meaning that the page doesn’t change unless you edit it), and will give the search engine a pretty clear idea of the content of the page. On the other hand, when the content is pulled from a database and is the result different parameters, you will get a dynamic URL with those parameters in it. There are two issues with that: first the search parameters are non-descriptive (they read something like item, sectionid, option  and so on), and this won’t give Google any information about the content. Also, when different parameters give the same result, there can be two or more URLs for the same content, leaving the search engine wondering which one should be indexed.

SEO Issue: You have one home page, but different URLs

Even when your site is not database-driven, your home page might still have different URLs pointing at it. For example:  http://example .com – http://www.example .com – http://example .com/index.php – http://www.example .com/index.php

The result of this division is that the page rank for the home page will be divided in four, thus diluting your efforts of building authority to your site.  The solution to dynamic and multiple URLs is an HTTP code called 301, which redirects all the different versions to the canonical one, making it more clear for the search engine.

The list is not complete – stay tuned for the second part…

Enhanced by Zemanta